Resources Directory | PLMA The Voice of Load Management Professionals

Welcome to PLMA's Resource Directory. This robust directory features links to numerous white papers, webinar recordings, conference presentations and reports written, presented and published by the top thought leaders and experts in the energy industry. This dynamic resource is fully accessible to all PLMA members. Although some content requires members to be logged in prior to viewing. A limited amount of content is available to non-members and PLMA allies.

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ADD A RESOURCE

If you would like to submit an item to include on the Resource Directory, email it, along with a short description, to [email protected]. Items (if approved for inclusion) received by the 10th of the month will be included in the current month’s update. Items received after the 10th will be included in the next month’s update.


PLMA Resources Directory

38th PLMA Conference, Austin, Texas, Nov. 12-14, 2018

38th PLMA Conference, Austin, Texas, Nov. 12-14, 2018

Real-world insight from practitioners and energy utilities active in the demand response marketplace. Over 200 demand response industry professionals attended from energy utilities and government agencies as well as industry allies, including consultants, manufacturers, and service providers. Presentation slides and photo gallery are accessible to conference attendees as well as all other PLMA member organization staff.

Source: PLMA
Type: Conference Proceedings with Photo gallery

37th PLMA Conference, Coronado, Calif., April 16-18, 2018

37th PLMA Conference, Coronado, Calif., April 16-18, 2018

Real-world insight from practitioners and energy utilities active in the demand response marketplace. Over 200 demand response industry professionals attended from energy utilities and government agencies as well as industry allies, including consultants, manufacturers, and service providers. Presentation slides and photo gallery are accessible to conference attendees as well as all other PLMA member organization staff.

Source: PLMA
Type: Conference Proceedings with Photo gallery


FEATURED CONTENT

PLMA's Leadership in Sharing Load Management Expertise

Today’s energy industry finds organizations adapting to new profiles PLMAof production and consumption within an evolving delivery environment. Energy utilities, solution providers and trade allies seek to better understand load management challenges to identify practical paths to implementing proven solutions.  Collectively, PLMA’s 140+ member organizations share a common goal to realize the potential of tomorrow’s energy industry for the benefit of all stakeholders. The non-profit association provides a forum for practitioners to share dynamic load management expertise, including demand response (DR) and distributed energy resources (DER).

Source: PLMA
Type: Article 

2018 PLMA Annual Activity Report to Members

Annual Report cover

This publication details the 2018 achievements of PLMA as "The Voice of Load Management Professionals."  PLMA grew to 154 electric utility and allied organization members in 2018, an increase of over 300% in 6 years.  

 

Source: PLMA; Edited by Thought Leadership Group
Type: Report

Thought Leadership 2018 Compendium

Awards Compendium cover

This publication is a compendium of transcripts from 8 selected webcasts, 37th PLMA Conference in Coronado, Calif., and 38th PLMA Conference in Austin, Texas produced in 2018.  

Source: PLMA; Edited by Thought Leadership Group
Type: Compendium

 

 

15th PLMA Award-Winning Load Management Initiatives Compendium

Awards Compendium cover

This publication is a compendium of six transcripts of webcast interviews with the 15th PLMA Award winners for best demand response and other load management programs, initiatives and achievements from calendar year. The winners are: Program Pacesetters: ComEd's Peak Time Savings Program and Gulf Power's Energy Select Program; Thought Leaders: Austin Energy's Green Building Initiative and Jennifer Potter; and Technology Pioneers: Hawaiian Electric Company's Regulation Reserves Program and Nest's Solar Eclipse Rush Hour Rewards Program.

Source: PLMA; Edited by Awards and Thought Leadership Group
Type: Compendium 

Non-Wires Alternatives: Case Studies from Leading U.S. Projects

NWA Report cover

This publication coproduced by PLMA and SEPA with funding from E4TheFuture profiles 10 industry-leading NWA projects of different sizes and types across the U.S., detailing the critical insights and lessons learned each has provided for utilities and other project developers.Non-wires alternatives, or NWAs, represent one of the most exciting opportunities for the transformation of U.S. utility business models. NWA projects can use distributed energy resources—including energy efficiency, demand response, solar, storage and microgrids—as least-cost energy solutions. By using NWAs, some utilities are delaying or deferring the need for comparably more expensive infrastructure, such as transmission and distribution projects.

Source: E4TheFuture with PLMA and SEPA
Type: Report

2018 Utility Demand Response Snapshot

While the energy industry seems focused on energy storage as a critical solution to many of the challenges of integrating renewables on the grid, a new industry report documents the growth of demand response (DR) as an increasingly valuable and flexible resource.

Based on data gathered directly from 155 utilities across the country, the 2018 Utility Demand Response Market Snapshot finds that, in 2017, an increasingly broad range of DR programs dispatched 10.7 gigawatts (GW) of energy savings to the grid. Total enrolled capacity -- that is, how much saved power was potentially available -- was 18.3 GW.

Source: SEPA with PLMA and Navigant Research
Type: Report

PLMA Practitioner Perspectives™ Compendium Considers Future of “Bring Your Own Thermostat” Programs

BYOT Compendium cover

This thought leadership publication is a compendium of eight energy utility, manufacturer, and solution provider viewpoints. “Bring Your Own Thermostat or BYOT programs are changing the face of energy utility load management and the way customers interact with their utilities,” says PLMA Chair Michael Brown of NV Energy. The compendium’s contributing authors were selected in an open call for submissions. Article drafts were reviewed by a team of mentors that included the PLMA Thermostat Interest Group co-chairs prior to publication.  The compendium details a consensus among the contributing practitioners that BYOT programs will remain a part of utility load management programs, but varying opinions on whether BYOT will replace or augment traditional direct install demand response program models; the relevance of new market segments as they relate to BYOT; and approaches to enhancing the value BYOT brings to demand response programs. 

Source: PLMA; Edited by Thermostat Interest Group
Type: Compendium 

Evolution of Demand Response in the United States Electricity Industry

DR Evolution

As PLMA refined and coordinated materials for the Demand Response Training Series, Michael Brown, NV Energy, together with the PLMA Education Committee and PLMA Training Partners realized there was not a singular, agreed upon definition of Demand Response and the stages of its evolution (DR 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0) to help new and transitioning professionals, regulators, and lawmakers understand the growth and trends of the industry, so they set out to develop a harmonized, consistent definition, followed by a public comment period.  This definition is used across the three demand response training courses produced by PLMA

Source: PLMA; Edited by Education Committee and PLMA Training Partners
Type: White Paper with Web Recording

The Hidden Battery: Opportunities in Electric Water Heating

HiddenBattery

This research examines the economic and grid benefits of controlling three different types of water heaters (80-gallon electric resistance, 50-gallon electric resistance, and heat pump water heaters) for peak shaving, thermal storage, and real-time fast response to supply fluctuations. Researchers modeled these program designs using 2014 data from the PJM and MISO markets. The researchers also modeled these programs using projected prices and energy resources in MISO in 2028 to determine the economic and environmental potential of electric water heaters to provide energy services to the grid in the future. 

Source: The Brattle Group; co-funded by PLMA, NRECA, and NRDC
Type: Report with Web Recording

2015 PLMA Member Resources Directory


December 2015

FERC Staff Issue Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering Report

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) staff has released its 10th annual report on demand response and advanced metering as required by Section 1252(e)(3) of Energy Policy Act of 2005(EPAct 2005). It is based on publicly-available information and discussions with market participants and industry experts. In it's summary based on the information reviewed, FERC says it appears that:

  • Deployment of advanced meters continues to increase throughout the country. According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA), an additional 8.7 million advanced meters were installed and operational between 2012 and 2013, resulting in advanced meters representing almost 38 percent of all meters in the United States
  • States and various federal agencies continue to undertake significant activities to promote demand response;
  • Supported by new policy efforts at the retail level, demand response in conjunction with other established and developing resources and technologies is facilitating innovative grid architectures and system operations; and,
  • While demand response barriers continue to be addressed, there is jurisdictional uncertainty associated with the Supreme Court’s review of Electric Power Supply Association v. FERC.

Read and download the full text of the 2015 Report: CLICK HERE

Source: FERC
Type: Industry Report


November 2015

16th PLMA Fall Conference, Charlotte, North Carolina

16th PLMA Fall Conference, Charlotte, North Carolina

Real-world insight from practitioners and energy utilities active in the demand response marketplace. Over 150 demand response industry professionals attended from energy utilities and government agencies as well as industry allies, including consultants, manufacturers, and service providers.

Source: PLMA
Type: Conference Proceedings with Photo gallery


October 2015

The Future of Demand Response: The Practitioner's View

The Future of Demand Response: The Practitioner's View

Until recently, demand response was mostly considered a stopgap measure to be used during a peak load event. Recently, however, utilities are beginning to see demand response as a tool to be used in system planning and operations, especially when it comes to integrating renewable energy. Peak Load Management Alliance (PLMA) Board Chairman Paul Tyno with Buffalo Energy Advisors, PLMA Board Vice Chairman Rich Philip with Duke Energy, and Extensible Energy President and CEO John Powers participated in a PLMA Demand Response Dialogue in early August. They discussed demand response's move into the mainstream and how utilities are incorporating demand response into their operating and business processes.

Source: Electric Light & Power
Type: Magazine article


July 2015

Demand Response Moves to the Mainstream

Demand Response Moves to the Mainstream

The idea of energy efficiency and demand reduction as a "fifth fuel" after coal, natural gas, nuclear and renewables is nothing new, but, despite that, efficiency and curtailment measures are typically incorporated into an energy plan as an afterthought or as a response to regulatory pressure. One such measure, demand response, or DR, has historically been a second-string player, only deployed when there's an emergency. And despite DR's contributions to maintaining grid stability, averting blackouts and brownouts, and reducing the impact of extreme summer and winter weather events, the industry has been slow to adopt it as a meaningful solution to managing the electric grid. We believe this slow adoption is about to change. Within the next five years, we see the role of DR shifting from that of understudy to key player. 2015 will be a transformative year for DR — one in which DR heads out of the shadows of emergency management and into its own as a legitimate market force.

Source: Energy Biz
Type: Magazine article
 
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